Archive for black and white

The Loneliness of a One-Player Game

Posted in Nothing Really with tags , , , , , on 3 September, 2009 by Ally
The Loneliness of a One-Player Game

The Loneliness of a One-Player Game

I appear to have accidentally encapsulated the human condition by naming a photograph of a games console.

Inanimate Objects 3: A Sequel Too Far

Posted in Nothing Really with tags , , , , , , on 31 October, 2008 by Ally

In a fit of abject boredom, I was moved to take some more photographs. Since I barely ever go anywhere, they are all once again confined to household objects and pets. And thanks to inadequate lighting, many of them appear to be the digital equivalent of “grainy” (which is sadly far less pleasant than film grain). Ah well, there are a few colour ones this time.

Looking Through the Glass

It Must Be Winter

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Inanimate Objects II: This Time It’s Impersonal

Posted in Nothing Really with tags , , , , , on 24 October, 2008 by Ally

The light was playing most pleasantly through the windows this evening, so I was inspired to take some more photographs. Click the thumbnails for big versions on Photobucket. For instance:

Special Branch

Noir Door

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Try This, Kids at Home!

Posted in Film, Film Noir, Nothing Really with tags , , , , , , , , , on 20 October, 2008 by Ally

I’m sure we all remember, or at least know of the controversy surrounding colorization. You know, when Orson Welles told Ted Turner to keep his crayons away from Citizen Kane, and film critics dedicated entire shows to preaching about the evils of colorization. As well as it being completely at odds with the artistic vision of the filmmakers, colorization’s biggest crime is somehow managing to look simultaneously garish and washed-out. Especially when it’s done wrong, giving Frank Sinatra brown eyes for example.

In short, it’s shit.

But have you ever considered viewing a colour film in black and white? I believe it was Billy Wilder that claimed black and white photography was best suited to performance-based films, as there are no colours to distract you from the acting. All you need to do is turn the colour down on your television and you have an instant decolorized film.

It’s a mere novelty, but sometimes it can allow you to appreciate certain aspects of a film that were previously hidden to you behind dazzling colours and effects. I tried it last night whilst watching The Big Lebowski, and you know what? It’s actually quite fun. The noir flourishes are more apparent in black and white, highlighting the Chandleresque plot rather nicely. I’m sure the Coen Brothers would be mortified to learn that their film was being viewed improperly, but fuck them. It’s my telly.

Photographs of Inanimate Objects

Posted in Nothing Really with tags , , , , , on 12 October, 2008 by Ally

I had a bit of a play with the family camera today, because I was that bored. After using Photoshop to make the pictures look slightly nicer, there were a few that came out pretty well I think. The first is clearly the best, but never mind eh?

The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul

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The Purple Rose of Cairo

Posted in Film, Woody Allen with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on 30 September, 2008 by Ally

Woody Allen, 1985

They always say you ought to write what you know, which is why so many films chronicle the creative process. From Sunset Boulevard to Adaptation, Hollywood’s favourite subject is itself. But great as they are, most of these films seem determined to make the audience understand the pain of the artist, the stress of putting together a production, how hard it is to make something look effortless. It’s rare to find a film that appreciates the finished product above all, and understands the spell it casts over the ordinary person sat there in the dark.

Woody Allen’s The Purple Rose of Cairo is one of those films. Set in Depression-era New Jersey, it stars Mia Farrow as Cecilia. She’s a timid woman with an abusive husband (Danny Aiello), and a stressful waitressing job which she constantly jeopardizes with her clumsiness and daydreaming. Her only comfort is the cinema, where she can lose herself in shimmering Hollywood gloss for an hour and a half.

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